Adding a TXT record to a DNS server - OpenVoice - LogMeIn

Find an Answer

Search OpenVoice articles, videos and user guides   Your search term must have 2 or more characters.

Browse Articles

Adding a TXT Record to a DNS Server

In order to define a domain organization with GoTo, you need to validate your company's ownership of specific email domains. One option is to add a text record to your domain's DNS settings. GoTo can then query the server and receive confirmation back of your ownership. (Alternately, you can upload a plain-text file to your web server root containing a verification string. See Set up domains.)

Back to Organization Center Contents

A TXT record contains information specifically intended for sources outside your domain. The text can be either human- or machine-readable and can be used for a variety of purposes including verifying domain ownership, authorizing senders with SPF, adding digital email signatures, and preventing outgoing spam.

IMPORTANT: If you have multiple domains to verify, you will need to add a text record for each domain.

Identify your domain host

If you do not know who is hosting your domain, there is a simple method for finding out. The following example uses the online utility site Whois.

1. Open whois.com.

2. Click Whois and enter the domain name. Click Search.

3. In the results, locate the name server for the site (e.g., CDCSERVICES.com). This is the domain host.

Add a TXT record

The method to add a text record to your domain will vary with hosts. The generic steps to add a text record to your domain are:

1. Sign in to your domain's account at your domain host.

2. Locate the page for updating your domain's DNS records. The page might be called something like DNS Management, Name Server Management, or Advanced Settings.

3. Locate the TXT records for your domain on this page.

4. Add a TXT record for the domain and for each subdomain. See Use cases.

5. Save your changes and wait until they take effect. This is generally very fast - less than a minute - but may take as much as 72 hours.

6. You can verify that the change has taken place. Open a command window on your system:

For Unix and Linux systems:

$ dig TXT main.com

For Windows systems:

c:\> nslookup -type=TXT main.com

The response will display on its own line (not appended to another), and will look something like:

main.com. 3600 IN TXT "citrix-verification-code=976afe6f-8039-40e4-95a5-261b462c9a36"

Use cases

Domain verification for domain main.com (2 different methods shown).

Name TTL* TypeValue / Answer / Destination
@3600IN TXT"citrix-verification-code=976afe6f-8039-40e4-95a5-261b462c9a36”
main.com3600IN TXT"citrix-verification-code=976afe6f-8039-40e4-95a5-261b462c9a36”

Subdomain verification for mail.main.com.

NameTTL*TypeValue / Answer / Destination
mail.main.com3600IN TXT
“citrix-verification-code=976afe6f-8039-40e4-95a5-261b462c9a36”

* TTL - Time To Live - is the number of seconds before changes to the TXT record go into effect.